30 Best Hitchcock Movies - Featured - StudioBinder

Alfred Hithcock is one of the all-time great auteur filmmakers. His films can be explained in the simplest of terms: You know it when you see it.

Over 55 years, Alfred Hitchcock directed dozens upon dozens of films, some of which have joined the pantheon of the greatest movies in cinema history.

In this article, we’re going to rank the 30 best Alfred Hitchcock movies based on these four criteria: legacy, suspense, filmmaking, and story.

Alfred Hitchcock Movies Filmography

30. The Lodger (1927)

The Lodger — Recut Full Film

Although Hitchcock directed several feature films in the mid 1920s, it wasn’t until the release of The Lodger in 1927 that he caught his big break.

The Lodger is a suspense-thriller that’s largely inspired by the serial killings of Jack the Ripper and stars Ivor Novello in the title role.
60%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
50%
Story
67%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Technical Ingenuity
  • Enduring Legacy
  • Strong Visuals
  • Pacing
  • Lacks Suspense
  • Story

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Lodger is a silent-era Hitchcock thriller about a serial killer on the loose.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

29. Stage Fright (1950)

Stage Fright — Trailer

Stage Fright is one of Hitchcock’s early “amateur detective” stories, in which a young or unsuspecting woman has to unravel a troublesome mystery.

In this picture, that woman is Eve (Jane Wyman) who must discover the true identity of a reckless murderer.

85%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
82%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Stage Metaphor
  • Suspenseful
  • Well-Directed
  • Not Well Remembered
  • At Times Confusing
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Stage Fright is a fun, yet ultimately minor work from Alfred Hitchcock.

Best Hitchcock Films

28. The Man Who Knew Too Much (1935)

The Man Who Knew Too Much — Restoration Demo

Alfred Hitchock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much is a fascinating thriller that largely established the director’s affinity for the international espionage trope.

The film stars Leslie Banks, Edna Best, and Peter Lorre, who had only recently left Germany before production. Lorre, perhaps best known for starring in Fritz Lang’s M, didn’t even know the English language before being cast in the role of the dastardly villain Abbot.
70%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
65%
Story
72%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Peter Lorre
  • Concert Hall Scene
  • Filmmaking Technique
  • Inconsistent Story
  • Suspense Lulls
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

​Alfred Hitchcock remade The Man Who Knew Too Much in 1956 with James Stewart and Doris Day, but the original remains the best version, especially in light of the new Criterion restoration.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

27. Saboteur (1942)

Saboteur — Trailer

Hitchcock’s early tale of mistaken identity, Saboteur, is another foundational piece in his filmography. There’s no doubt that Saboteur would go on to inspire some of Hitchock’s most iconic works.

The film follows a man named Kane (Robert Cummings) who is on the run from the police after being framed for a deadly fire.

70%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
65%
Story
77%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Visuals
  • Groundbreaking
  • Strong Story
  • Muddled Legacy
  • Middle Lull
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Though it’s been lost within the plethora of Hitchock’s other stories about mistaken identity, Saboteur remains a mostly fun spy thriller.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

26. The Trouble with Harry (1955)

The Trouble with Harry — Full Movie

The Trouble with Harry doesn’t quite seem like an Alfred Hitchcock film: It isn’t all that suspenseful, the setting isn’t busy, and the story is unusually quaint.

That said, The Trouble with Harry succeeds because it stands apart from the rest of Hitchcock’s works. The best part of the film may very well be Bernard Hermann’s score, which was the first time he composed for Alfred Hitchcock.
70%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
77%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Visuals
  • Ending
  • Soundtrack
  • Plodding
  • Low-Stakes Story
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Trouble with Harry is like a classic landscape painting: It’s great to look at on the surface, but there’s not much substance in the background.

Best Hitchcock Films

25. I Confess (1952)

I Confess — Trailer

I Confess is definitely one of the most dramatic and consequential of Hitchcock’s pictures. Released between Strangers on a Train and Dial M for Murder, I Confess has been somewhat lost to time.

The film stars Montgomery Clift in the leading role as a priest who’s wrongly suspected of murder. I Confess puts the ethics of privacy of the church on the stand, which ultimately results in showing the oath of silence in a new light.
75%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
82%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Strong Story Arc
  • Elaborate Sets
  • Moral
  • Heavy-Drama
  • Overlooked
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

I Confess is a good film that’s held back by melodrama and unbelievable circumstances.

Best Hitchcock Movies Ranked

24. Marnie (1964)

Sean Connery on Hitchcock and Marnie

Just one year after the release of The Birds, Alfred Hitchcock released Marnie, his second collaboration with star Tippi Hedren. Marnie is a rather heavy-drama about trauma in the wake of sexual abuse.

Hedren never worked with Hitchcock again after the release of Marnie, citing the director’s obsessive infatuation with her as the main reason. In her later years, Hedren accused Hitchcock of making obscene sexual demands of her, which he strongly denied.

These accusations have surely complicated the legacy of Marnie, due to its illicit subject matter.
85%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
82%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Bold
  • Story Arc
  • Cast
  • Message of the Film
  • Marred Legacy
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Marnie is known as one of Hitchcock’s more contentious pictures, but Bernard Hermann’s excellent score alone makes it worth seeing.

Best Hitchcock Films

23. The Wrong Man (1956)

The Wrong Man — Trailer

The Wrong Man represents a mid-stage reflection for Alfred Hitchcock, as the director analyzed the nature of crime under a modern, more dramatic light.

This film is based on a true story of a man falsely accused of robberies throughout New York City in the early 1950s.

80%
Suspense
75%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
78%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Henry Fonda
  • Original
  • Moral Lesson
  • Dry Elements
  • Visually Bland
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Wrong Man is one of the great Hollywood “wrongful conviction films” and one of Hitchcock’s more unique works.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

22. The 39 Steps (1935)

The 39 Steps — Full Movie

Few films of the 1930s and 1940s were as influential on writers of the “Hollywood New Wave” as The 39 Steps was. In an interview with The New Yorker, renowned screenwriter Robert Towne said, “It’s not much of an exaggeration to say that all contemporary escapist entertainment begins with The 39 Steps.”

I’ll admit, I’m not quite as fond of the movie as Towne is, but his assertion that the film was a foundational piece of escapist cinema is undeniable. 

Twenty-four years before there was North by Northwest, and 53 before Enemy of the State, there was The 39 Steps, a film that has inspired countless stories of wrongfully convicted people on the run.
75%
Suspense
70%
Filmmaking
75%
Story
73%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Influential
  • Strong Story Arc
  • Iconic Climax
  • Slow Pace
  • At Times Dull
  • Visually Mediocre

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The 39 Steps is a film that every director should see, regardless of how it has aged in the past 85 years.

Best Hitchcock Films

21. Family Plot (1976)

Alfred Hitchcock Family Plot — Trailer

First and foremost: Can we please acknowledge the trailer above? Alfred Hitchcock was widely known to not only cameo in his own films, but narrate their trailers as well. That being said, the Family Plot trailer is beyond absurd — and not in a bad way. Actually, quite the contrary, it’s a kind of comic masterpiece.

Family Plot was the last film Hitchcock made before his death, and although it’s not his greatest work, it still boasts a fun, albeit ludicrous story with classic elements of suspense, drama, and dark comedy.
80%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
80%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Comically Fun
  • Inventive
  • Suspenseful
  • "Psychic" Prop
  • Unbelievable Story
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Family Plot is “middle of the road Hitchcock” that sees the director’s lighter side break through in his twilight years.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

20. Frenzy (1972)

Alfred Hitchcock on Frenzy

Frenzy was not only one of Hitchcock’s last films ever made, but also a return to England for the director. Most of the film’s cast was unknown at the time of production, which was atypical for a Hitchcock picture. (Most of his works feature at least one star.)

Despite being unoriginal to a fault, Frenzy stands apart for its clear, purposeful narrative and impressive cinematography.
80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
87%
OVERALL SCORE
  • World Building
  • Story Arc
  • Cinematography
  • Unoriginal
  • Tonally Disjointed
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Frenzy is yet another Hitchcock tale of mistaken identity and murder — one elevated by great visuals and a strong story arc.

Best Hitchcock Films

19. The Paradine Case (1948)

The Paradine Case — Trailer

Courtroom dramas weren’t widely popularized until the late 1950s, with the likes of 12 Angry Men, To Kill a Mockingbird, Inherit the Wind and many more. But that didn’t stop Hitchcock from directing the influential The Paradine Case 10 years prior.

The Paradine Case is a story about a lawyer who falls in love with his client that was accused of murder. In a rare turn for Hitchcock, we don’t know whether or not the accused woman is guilty or not. It’s refreshing to see a Hitchcock picture that doesn’t have a wrongful suspicion or “wrong-man” plot.
85%
CHARACTERS
75%
TRAGEDY
80%
VIOLENCE
80%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Unique Perspective
  • Pioneering Story
  • Nuanced Ending
  • At Times Bland
  • Lacks Motif
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Paradine Case received mixed reviews from fans and critics for lacking dynamic interest, but its influence and ending make it a strong Hitchcock picture that’s worth a watch.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

18. Lifeboat (1944)

Hitchcock Cameo in Lifeboat

Lifeboat is a brilliant minor work from Hitchcock, produced in the midst of World War II.

The film takes place entirely on a lifeboat, and was shot mostly at the studio lot (fake ocean). It’s certainly not an epic by studio standards, but it makes the most of what it’s got — which, as it turns out, happens to be a great deal.

75%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
82%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Technical Ingenuity
  • Focused Story
  • Moral of Mercy
  • Not Great Suspense
  • Story Can Drag
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Lifeboat is a story of mercy across the seas, told and released in a very troubling time.

Best Hitchcock Films

17. Young and Innocent (1938)

Crane Shot in Young and Innocent

Young and Innocent is a by-the-book story of being in the wrong place at the wrong time, elevated by narrative nuance and excellent filmmaking.

The film stars Nova Pilbeam as a well-intentioned young woman who’s caught in the middle of a murder case. Pilbeam gives an excellent performance, which ties together the picture quite nicely.

80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
85%
Story
85%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Leading Acting
  • Crane Shot
  • Final Act
  • Forgotten Legacy
  • Slow
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Young and Innocent is perhaps best known for the excellent crane shot used in the film’s climax.

Alfred Hitchcock Filmography

16. Spellbound (1945)

Spellbound — Full Movie

Spellbound is a twisting and turning suspense thriller from Alfred Hitchcock that nearly reaches the heights of his greatest works. Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck star in the film and both give excellent performances.

The picture’s progressive story follows a psychoanalyst who must use her intelligence and training to deduce the psyche of a killer. It’s a fantastical film, marred only by poor pacing and some rare filmmaking blunders from director Alfred Hitchcock.

90%
Suspense
75%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
85%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Ingrid Bergman
  • Suspense
  • Forward-Thinking
  • Ski Scene
  • Third Act Pacing
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Spellbound may be best known for the dream sequence conceived by Salvador Dali, but there’s plenty more going on in the story to make it a worthwhile watch.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

15. Foreign Correspondent (1940)

Alfred Hitchcock on Foreign Correspondent

Foreign Correspondent is a classic Hitchcock tale of espionage that stands apart for its timely social commentary.

Released in 1940, Foreign Correspondent was a cinematic response to the tension of world politics before World War II.
80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
83%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Plane Crash Scene
  • Technical Effects
  • Timely
  • At Times Plodding
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Foreign Correspondent was just one of two Hitchcock movies nominated for Best Picture at the 1941 Oscars. The other was Rebecca.

Best Hitchcock Movies Ranked

14. Rope (1940)

Hitchcock on the long take in Rope

Rope is widely known as the “one take” Alfred Hitchcock film, but in reality, it was actually cut together to seem continuous through elaborate camera tricks. 

The story of Rope revolves around two young men who murder their aquintance, then host a dinner party with the deceased’s family and friends. They do this as a twisted philosophy experiment in which they hope to prove that they can get away with murder.

I’m not the first to suggest that Rope was better suited for the stage than it was for the screen, but the story is dynamic enough that it still entertains through a cinema projector or TV.
85%
Suspense
75%
Filmmaking
95%
Story
85%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Dynamic Story
  • Philosophical
  • Strong Acting
  • Gimmicky
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Rope is perhaps more significant as a lesson in filmmaking than it is as a film, as pushing the envelope in a new direction doesn’t always make a picture better.

Best Hitchcock Films

13. To Catch a Thief (1955)

To Catch a Thief — Trailer

To Catch a Thief is a 1950s popcorn-picture that has just enough suspense to work through to the end. The film is carried, perhaps more than any other Hitchcock film, by its two lead actors: Grace Kelly and Cary Grant, who have great on-screen chemistry.

As you watch To Catch a Thief — especially if you’re a first-timer — note how many times Cary Grant’s character, Robie, is referred to as “The Cat.” It’s insane how widely the character is associated with his robber moniker — as if he’s some plunderous comic book villain whose superpower is stealing jewels across the French Riviera.
80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
83%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Great Performances
  • Beautiful Visuals
  • At Times Thrilling
  • Cheesy Story
  • Cliched
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

To Catch a Thief is a classic Hitchcock picture, sans the drama that the majority of his catalogue is famous for.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

12. The Lady Vanishes (1938)

The Lady Vanishes — Criterion

The Lady Vanishes was one of the last pictures Hitchcock directed in Great Britain before relocating to Hollywood in 1939. It’s fitting, then, that the film would go on to inspire many of his later works, including Strangers on a Train.

It takes a little while for the plot of The Lady Vanishes to get going, but once it does, its freight train-like narrative never lets up. What starts as a benign story about people being snowed in at an overpacked inn morphs into an all-out international war thriller.
80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
85%
Story
85%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Thematically Rich
  • Strong Visuals
  • Horrifying
  • Low Suspense
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Lady Vanishes is a great mystery-thriller that roars with life once it gets going.

Best Hitchcock Films

11. The Birds (1963)

Alfred Hitchcock Discusses The Birds

Birds? Why would someone make a horror film about birds?,” you might ask. I hate birds. Lots of people hate birds. That’s due to a phenomenon known as ornithophobia — the fear of birds — and Hitchcock understood better than anyone how to tap into it. 

The Birds is one of Hitchcock’s most iconic works and it’s inspired countless spoofs and parodies over the years. For as silly as a swarm of birds inexplicably attacking people may seem to some, the film speaks more broadly to base human fears about how fragile our sense of security in the world actually is. The delicate balance of our daily routines could unravel and disrupt our lives forever — a horrifying theme indeed.
80%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
85%
Story
85%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Thematically Rich
  • Strong Visuals
  • Horrifying
  • Low Suspense
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

The Birds is a multi-layered horror thriller from Hitchcock whose weighty themes cut beneath its story’s strange and frightening surface.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

10. Dial M for Murder (1954)

“I have crossed oceans of time to find you.”

A seminal title in Alfred Hitchcock’s canon, Dial M for Murder is a complex thriller with elaborate branching narratives. The film is based on a play of the same name that was written by Frederick Knott.

Dial M for for Murder’s enduring cinematic legacy rests upon the sophistication and strong resolution of its narrative. The principal cast, led by Ray Milland and Grace Kelly, carries the film with absorbing and wonderful performances.
90%
Suspense
80%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
87%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Lead Cast
  • Story Resolution
  • Suspense
  • Best Suited for the Stage
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Dial M for Murder is a great stage story that’s solidly adapted to the silver screen by Alfred Hitchcock.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

9. Suspicion (1941)

Suspicion — Milk Scene

Hitchcock turns a nighttime glass of milk into a thrilling narrative device in Suspicion. As the name of the film implies, suspicion abounds, right up until the credits roll.

In a film in which nothing is for certain, Cary Grant delivers a nuanced performance that keeps the audience guessing as to his true character.

90%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
90%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Cary Grant
  • Milk Scene
  • Climax
  • Not Well Remembered
  • Driving POV
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Ultimately, Suspicion proves to be one of the most engaging of Hitchcock’s early works.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Films

8. Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

Shadow of a Doubt — Full Movie

Boy, Alfred Hitchcock sure does love crimes on trains. Gruesome train crime aside though, Shadow of a Doubt really is one of Hitchcock’s most well-rounded pictures.

Shadow of a Doubt has a strong narrative arc that doesn’t suffer from the pacing issues in some of his other pictures. Although not rare for a Hitchcock work, the film is anchored by excellent lead performances, especially from Joseph Cotten.
90%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
90%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Story
  • Thrilling
  • Joseph Cotten
  • Easy Mystery
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Alfred Hitchcock declared Shadow of a Doubt to be his favorite of the films he made on more than one occasion, which should speak volumes about its quality.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

7. Rear Window (1954)

Making of Rear Window

It’s hard to find fault with the brilliant Rear Window. The film is undoubtedly one of the most iconic made during the Golden Age of Hollywood, and has inspired countless pictures since its release, such as The Conversation and Disturbia.

Considering the time in which it was made, Rear Window’s forward-thinking story is perhaps its most notable element. 

At the time of the film’s release, anyone labeled a voyeur was usually assumed to have psychological issues. But with the advent of technology and smartphones in particular, voyeurism has become normalized in mainstream culture. 

Millions of people obsessively follow others’ daily lives on the internet. The only difference between when Rear Window was released and now is that it’s easier for anyone being “watched” online to create idealized images of themselves.
80%
Suspense
100%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
87%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Filmmaking
  • Enduring Legacy
  • Iconic
  • Pace
  • Lower Suspense
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Need an example of how to make the most of a single location on your next shoot? Look no further than Rear Window.

Hitchcock Movies Ranked

6. Rebecca (1940)

Rebecca — “Why Do You Hate Me?” Scene

Rebecca is one of Hitchcock’s great early works. The film is full of suspense and intrigue, which invites the audience into an otherworldly setting where the truth seems as elusive as a white rabbit.

Joan Fontaine, who also collaborated with Hitchcock on Suspicion, steals the show as a well-intentioned wife whose embroiled in a dark, sinister environment.
95%
Suspense
33%
Filmmaking
89%
Story
72%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Joan Fontaine
  • Mystery
  • Tense
  • Character Development
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Rebecca is the only Alfred Hitchcock film to win the Academy Award for Best Picture. It’s essential viewing for the auteur’s committed fans.

Top Alfred Hitchcock Movies

5. Psycho (1960)

Alfred Hitchcock on Psycho

It’s a bit funny that of all the 50-plus films Hitchcock has made, Psycho is far and away the most iconic. Psycho is much more intimate than Hitchcock’s epics, and that intimacy is what brings the director’s attention into focus.

The sinister story of Psycho was a major sparkplug for horror cinema, which would only continue to grow in the decades following the release of the film.
90%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
90%
Story
90%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Anthony Perkins
  • Narrative Focus
  • Enduring Legacy
  • Obvious Mystery
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Anthony Perkins steals the show in Psycho as the maniacal slasher killer Norman Bates.

Best Alfred Hitchcock Movies Ranked

4. Strangers on a Train (1951)

Strangers on a Train — Trailer

Strangers on a Train is a surprisingly engrossing thriller. What begins as a simple encounter between — you guessed it — two strangers on a train becomes a cat-and-mouse game of murder and blackmail.

The film is probably most famous for a scene in which the two strangers have a deadly battle aboard a carousel moving at light speed. Jokes aside, Strangers on a Train is an undoubtedly thrilling movie from Alfred Hitchcock, even when delving into its dark subject matter.
95%
Suspense
90%
Filmmaking
85%
Story
90%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Set Design
  • Technical Effects
  • Suspenseful
  • Sometimes Cheesy
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Strangers on a Train is a classic suspense-thriller from Hitchcock and one of the most engrossing pictures that he ever made.

Hitchcock Movies Ranked

3. North by Northwest (1959)

Crop duster attack in North by Northwest

Alfred Hitchcock’s most famous film about mistaken identity North by Northwest is also one of his best. The film stars his frequent collaborator Cary Grant in the starring role as a man on the run from mysterious, yet deadly forces.

Although it’s sometimes held back by poor pacing, North by Northwest’s elaborate sets and epic scale make it one of the great big budget pictures of the 1950s.
90%
Suspense
100%
Filmmaking
80%
Story
90%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Mt. Rushmore Scene
  • Fun Story
  • Cary Grant
  • Pacing Issues
  • Unoriginal Story
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

North by Northwest is escapist entertainment done right, with outstanding performances and vision to boot.

Hitchcock Movies Ranked

2. Notorious (1946)

The most famous shot in Notorious

Alfred Hitchcock hit the lottery casting Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman opposite one another in Notorious. The duo have excellent chemistry, which carries the narrative through thick and thin to an excellent finale.

Notorious is also a film of clear, intentional design. Few films in Hitchcock’s catalogue have shots directed as purposefully as the ones Hitchcock composed for Notorious.
90%
Suspense
100%
Filmmaking
95%
Story
95%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Lead Cast
  • Camera Control
  • Ending
  • Drags in Middle
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Notorious epitomizes Hitchcock’s signature blend of dark humor, suspense, and relationship drama.

Top Alfred Hitchcock Movies

1. Vertigo (1976)

Filmmakers of Vertigo

Vertigo is Alfred Hitchcock’s undisputed masterpiece: a deeply nuanced story of obsession conveyed with dreamlike imagery. Although many of Hitchcock’s other films deal with taboo subject matter, none do so as explicitly as Vertigo.

James Stewart stars as Scottie, a detective who develops severe acrophobia (fear of heights) after witnessing a woman fall to her death. What follows is a thinly-connected story of Scottie’s aimless wanderings across San Francisco, and his obsession with an idealized woman.

Vertigo explores the subconscious of a perverted mind with piercing insight. The film asks audiences: How far would you go to get back what you once loved?
100%
Suspense
100%
Filmmaking
100%
Story
100%
OVERALL SCORE
  • Visuals
  • Layered Story
  • Acrophobia Metaphor
  • N/A
  • N/A
  • N/A

Alfred Hitchcock Films

Conclusion

Vertigo is a shining example of Alfred Hitchcock’s trademark stylistic flourishes and thematic obsessions. Ultimately, the film is the very best in an ouvre filled with timeless classics.

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