Camera Angles in Film - Low Angle Shot - Header - StudioBinder

You’re looking for a list of the different camera angles in film, but you also want great examples that come with clear explanations of when and why to use specific camera shot angles.

In this post, we’ll provide you with downloadable shot lists that feature all of the different types of camera shot angles in film. Lezgo.

Step-by-step guide to making a shot list

Subscribe for more filmmaking videos like this.


Camera Angles

Camera Shot Angle Overview

It's not enough to just understand shot size. Camera angles, and degree of those angles, can totally change the meaning of a shot.

Here is a shot list with the different types of camera shot angles:

Camera Shot Angles  •  Shot Listed in StudioBinder

In this section we'll cover all the different types of camera angles in film and provide you with plenty of camera angle examples:

Eye Level Shot Example

Eye Level Shot

Our first camera angle is the eye level shot, and this is when your subject is at eye-level. An eye level shot can result in a neutral perspective (not superior or inferior). This mimics how we see people in real life -- our eye line connecting with theirs, and it can break down boundaries. 

Here's an example of the eye level camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Eye Level Shot - Game of Thrones - StudioBinder

Eye Level Shot Example | Game of Thrones

Eye level shots are actually much less standard than one might initially think, because directors often prefer to place the camera at shoulder level to attain a much more cinematic look. 

Low Angle SHOT Example

Low Angle Shot

This shot frames the subject from a low camera height. These camera shots most often emphasize power dynamics between characters.

Here's an example of the low angle camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Low Angle Shot - The Matrix - StudioBinder

Low Angle Shot - The Matrix

Low angle camera shots are a perfect camera angle for signaling superiority or to elicit feelings of fear and dread.

Low Angle Examples | StudioBinder

High Angle Shot Example

High Angle Shot

In a high angle shot, the camera points down at your subject. It usually creates a feeling of inferiority, or “looking down” on your subject.

Here's an example of the high angle camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - High Angle Shot - The Avengers - StudioBinder

High Angle Shot Example | Avengers

Here is our video on how you can use high angle shots in your film. 

But, as the video below shows, there are creative expressions of this:

High Angle Shot Examples | StudioBinder

Hip Level Shot Example

Hip Level Shot

A hip level shot is when your camera is roughly waist-high. Hip level shots are often useful when one subject is seated while the other stands.

Hip level shots can also be extremely useful camera angles for when you have action that occurs near the hip, like weapons being drawn, or someone reaching into their pocket. 

Here's an example of the hip level camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Hip Level Shot - Wide Medium Shot- Punch Drunk Love - StudioBinder

Hip Level Shot Example | Punk-Drunk Love

Knee Level Shot Example

Knee Level Shot

This is when your camera height is about as low as your subject’s knees. They can emphasize a character’s superiority if paired with a low angle.

Here's an example of the knee level camera angle:

Knee-Level-Shot-Home-Alone-StudioBinder

Knee Level Shot | Home Alone

Ground Level Shot Example

Ground Level Shot

A ground level shot is when your camera’s height is on ground level with your subject. This camera angle is used a lot to feature a character walking without revealing their face, but it can help to make the viewer more active and use the actor's performance to build an idea. 

Here's an example of the ground level camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Ground Level Shot - Burn After Reading - StudioBinder

Ground Level Shot Example | Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi

Shoulder Level Shot Example

Shoulder Level Shot

A shoulder level shot is a camera angle that is as high as your subject’s shoulders. Shoulder level shots are actually much more standard than an eye level shot, which can make your actor seem shorter than reality.

Here's an example of the shoulder level camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Shoulder Level Shot - Black Panther - StudioBinder

Shoulder Level Shot | Black Panther

A shoulder level shot will make your actors happier than an eye level shot, which shouldn't be your first priority, but not your last either. 

Dutch Angle Example

Dutch Angle or Dutch Tilt Shot

For a dutch angle (dutch tilt), the camera is slanted to one side. With the horizon lines tilted in this way, you can create a sense of disorientation.

Here's an example of the dutch angle camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Dutch Angle - Mission Impossible - StudioBinder

Dutch Angle Camera Angle | StudioBinder

Here's a video example of the dutch angle camera angle:

Dutch Angle Example | StudioBinder

Overhead Shot Example

Overhead Shot or Bird's Eye Shot

An overhead shot is from above, looking down on your subject. An overhead shot doesn't need to be super high, but it can be. 

Here's an example of the overhead shot camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Overhead Shot - The Great Gatsby - StudioBinder

Overhead Shot Camera Angle | StudioBinder

Aerial Shot Example

Aerial Shot

Whether taken from a helicopter or drone, this is a shot from way up high. It establishes a large expanse of scenery. Many of the helicopter shots in Black Hawk Down are aerial shots.

Here's an example of the aerial shot camera angle:

Camera Shot Guide - Aerial Shot - Black Hawk Down - StudioBinder

Aerial Shot Example | Black Hawk Down

Affordable drones have made aerial photography more accessible to filmmakers. Once considered a big-budget luxury or stock-footage mainstay, original aerial photography is now within reach of almost any production, all thanks to the "rise" of drones (and Sky-net).

UP NEXT

50+ Camera Shots: The Complete Guide

If you'd like to see our entire list of camera shots in film, make sure to check out the 50+ Camera Shots in Film post, where you get even more information on film shots and how to use them in your movies. 

Up Next: 50+ Camera Shots in Film →
Solution - Shot List and Storyboard

Showcase your vision with elegant shot lists and storyboards.

Create robust and customizable shot lists. Upload images to make storyboards and slideshows. 

Learn More ➜

4K Shares
4K Shares
Copy link